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Calling all cooks...

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Chuck Roast

Postby E-lad » Fri Apr 29, 2011 5:28 pm

Here's my chuck (pot) roast in seven easy steps.
Life is a comedy for those who think, and a tragedy for those who feel.- Horace Walpole
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Re: Calling all cooks...

Postby lehman scott » Tue May 31, 2011 4:55 am

This is lehman's Chicken Breasts in Mustard and Tarragon Recipe...

This was stolen and modified from a recipe i ran across quite some time ago and have long since lost... but i think mine is better than the original. It is my favorite way to cook chicken and never fails to please the guests, even your 85-year-old bigoted uncle whom you love in spite of his prejudices and swears he'd never eat chicken prepared in such a way but yet eats up platefuls of it when put in front of him. A little bit time-consuming, but worth every moment. I don’t know anyone who hasn’t loved this dish. I make this at least once a month.

Ingredients:

Boneless skinless chicken breasts
Butter
Olive Oil
Garlic
Onions or shallots
Dry white wine
Chicken stock
Whipping Cream
Dijon Mustard
Tarragon

Optional Ingredients:
Bacon
Capers
Morel mushrooms

Quantities are approximate. Go with your gut.

In a heavy skillet/pot with lid melt a gob of butter (1/4-1/3 stick approx.) with an equal amount of good olive oil to boiling. Use medium-high heat.

Throw in a bunch of boneless skinned chicken breasts. Put the cover on the pot/skillet. The oil will be hot and fly out and burn you if you don't. The objective here is to sear the breasts hotly so they are lightly browned on both sides. Again, be careful of the hot oil.

After browned, remove to covered plate. Keep warm in oven if desired. I don't bother.

Reduce heat to skillet/pan. Add another tab of butter. Add the garlic and onions/shallots, both finely minced. Saute to the point of browning.

When just lightly browned, add a can or two of chicken stock and a cup or two of chardonnay or other dry white wine. Return wine to refrigerator (you will need this later). The more stock and wine you use, the more sauce you will have (yum). Bring to a boil and reduce heat to a healthy simmer/light boil.

For the next 20-30 minutes you are going to stand there stirring this with a whisk or wooden spoon until the liquid reduces in volume. Make sure to get the nice little brown crispies off the bottom of the pan.

When you are nearing the point of reduction termination (next step), pour in the liquid underneath the chicken breasts you seared earlier.

Now comes sauce reduction termination, the most crucial moment in the preparation of this dish. Terminate too soon, your sauce will be runny; too late, it will be too thick. If you’ve never done a reduction before, you will find that after making this a couple of times (and you will) you will get the hang of when the moment is based on how thick you like the sauce. Remember: the termination point comes and goes quickly, do not leave the stove to go check the chatter on SMRT or you’ll miss it. Your final volume should be 1/2 to ¾ cup or thereabouts depending on your initial liquid volumes.

Okay, now whisk in a small or medium container of whipping cream into the sauce and blend (size of container is proportional to the amount of reduced liquid, and hence, amount of stock and wine you used in the first place. Getting the hang of this cooking-by-the-seat -of your-pants yet if you have never done it before? And if you haven't, you by all means should. There is truly no more enjoyable way to cook. : ).

Add tarragon. Crush it first to liberate the flavors if you have a mortar and pestle. If not, just toss it in and stir. Amount to taste. I like a lot.

Add Mustard. Not your normal American mustard, the Dijon variety. Regular or honey mustard, try it both ways in separate attempts and see what you like better. Either way, put in a good-sized gob or two or three sufficient to match the intensity of the tarragon and how mustardy you want it to be.

Add some white or ground black pepper to taste. You know what kind and how much you like.

Get everything nice and blended. Do not let it boil or things could separate. A gentle simmer with a few bubbles here and there is fine.

Return the seared chicken to the sauce. Spoon the sauce over the chicken for a time to complete any inner cooking which remains to be done (which shouldn’t be much). Flip the breasts over and repeat. When chicken is back up to hot temperature it is ready to eat.

Serve chicken with basmati rice and steamed fresh or frozen peas. If you use canned peas the ghost of lehman’s Mother will come and haunt you forever.

Now have a couple of SMRTers over to your house. Remove Chardonnay from fridge and serve it and food to them and yourself. Enjoy!

Variations to this dish: BACON: not too much, you don’t want to overpower everything else. Make sure it is finely minced so it blends with the sauce. CAPERS: same here, capers have a strong flavor, don’t overdo. And my favorite, chopped MOREL MUSHROOMS make this dish to die for. Regular mushrooms are a no-no.

Yummy yummy! Enjoy!
Change will not come if we wait for some other person or some other time. We are the ones we've been waiting for. We are the change that we seek.
- - Barack Obama

Pessimism of the Intellect; Optimism of the Will.
- - Antonio Gramsci
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Re: Calling all cooks...

Postby CityonaHill » Sun Jun 26, 2011 2:06 pm

Just wanted to share this because It.Is.Awesome. And super easy.

Image

Blintz Pancakes

1 cup all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup (8oz) sour cream
1 cup (8oz) 4% cottage cheese
4 eggs, lightly beaten
Strawberry/raspberry/blueberry syrup,
sliced fresh strawberries, butter & powdered sugar,
optional

In a large bowl, combine the flour, sugar and salt. Stir in the sour cream and eggs until blended; followed by the cottage cheese, until blended.

Pour batter by 1/4 cupful onto greased hot griddle in batches; turn when bubbles form on top. Cook until the second side is golden brown. Serve with syrup and strawberries if desired.

My personal preference is to put butter on and top with powdered sugar, with sliced fresh strawberries (as demonstrated in the picture) TRY IT...or else! :D
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Re: Calling all cooks...

Postby E-lad » Sun Jun 26, 2011 4:20 pm

That batter! Holy....cot cheese/ cream cheese/ eggs- can't imagine what that will be like. Will try it in the next few days!
Life is a comedy for those who think, and a tragedy for those who feel.- Horace Walpole
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Re: Calling all cooks...

Postby lehman scott » Sun Jul 03, 2011 10:08 pm

The Beer Archaelogist

This is a great read. I have been a long-time homebrewer (although I am ashamed to confess I have never gotten around to making mead :( ) and so found this essay fascinating. The level of scientific analysis involved in reconstructing these brews is impressive, informative, and (I can only imagine) uniquely delicious. Cheers, mate!

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-a ... =fullstory

It’s just after dawn at the Dogfish Head brewpub in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware, where the ambition for the morning is to resurrect an Egyptian ale whose recipe dates back thousands of years.

But will the za’atar—a potent Middle Eastern spice mixture redolent of oregano—clobber the soft, floral flavor of the chamomile? And what about the dried doum-palm fruit, which has been giving off a worrisome fungusy scent ever since it was dropped in a brandy snifter of hot water and sampled as a tea?

“I want Dr. Pat to try this,” says Sam Calagione, Dogfish Head’s founder, frowning into his glass.

At last, Patrick McGovern, a 66-year-old archaeologist, wanders into the little pub, an oddity among the hip young brewers in their sweat shirts and flannel. Proper to the point of primness, the University of Pennsylvania adjunct professor sports a crisp polo shirt, pressed khakis and well-tended loafers; his wire spectacles peek out from a blizzard of white hair and beard. But Calagione, grinning broadly, greets the dignified visitor like a treasured drinking buddy. Which, in a sense, he is.

The truest alcohol enthusiasts will try almost anything to conjure the libations of old. They’ll slaughter goats to fashion fresh wineskins, so the vintage takes on an authentically gamey taste. They’ll brew beer in dung-tempered pottery or boil it by dropping in hot rocks. The Anchor Steam Brewery, in San Francisco, once cribbed ingredients from a 4,000-year-old hymn to Ninkasi, the Sumerian beer goddess.

“Dr. Pat,” as he’s known at Dogfish Head, is the world’s foremost expert on ancient fermented beverages, and he cracks long-forgotten recipes with chemistry, scouring ancient kegs and bottles for residue samples to scrutinize in the lab. He has identified the world’s oldest known barley beer (from Iran’s Zagros Mountains, dating to 3400 B.C.), the oldest grape wine (also from the Zagros, circa 5400 B.C.) and the earliest known booze of any kind, a Neolithic grog from China’s Yellow River Valley brewed some 9,000 years ago.

Widely published in academic journals and books, McGovern’s research has shed light on agriculture, medicine and trade routes during the pre-biblical era. But—and here’s where Calagione’s grin comes in—it’s also inspired a couple of Dogfish Head’s offerings, including Midas Touch, a beer based on decrepit refreshments recovered from King Midas’ 700 B.C. tomb, which has received more medals than any other Dogfish creation.

“It’s called experimental archaeology,” McGovern explains.
Change will not come if we wait for some other person or some other time. We are the ones we've been waiting for. We are the change that we seek.
- - Barack Obama

Pessimism of the Intellect; Optimism of the Will.
- - Antonio Gramsci
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Re: Calling all cooks...

Postby Whateverman » Mon Jul 04, 2011 2:47 am

I've been homebrewing for 2 decades now, and I can not stand Dogfish Head beer.

I haven't made mead either, Lehman, but have done a few wines as well as dozens of different kinds/varietals of beer. My favorite recipe comes from an old issue of Zymurgy: Blue Whale Ale. I'll post it when I find it...
"Polymath" means "having learned much"; the correct word for "having failed to learn much" is simply "Ray".
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Re: Calling all cooks...

Postby E-lad » Sun Apr 08, 2012 2:18 pm

Life is a comedy for those who think, and a tragedy for those who feel.- Horace Walpole
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Re: Calling all cooks...

Postby zilch » Sun Apr 08, 2012 6:37 pm

I'm sure they're scrumptious, froggie, but I'd have to close my eyes to eat them.

Speaking of old beer- my father used to brew, and last time I was in my parent's house, two years ago, I unearthed a few bottles he'd put down more than thirty years ago. It was- interesting.
You were born. And so you're free. So happy birthday.
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Re: Calling all cooks...

Postby E-lad » Mon May 07, 2012 5:35 pm

Chicken and Biscuits

Cut one medium onion in half longitudinally and slice it fairly thin.
Saute the onion in 3 Tbls butter for 12 minutes
Then sprinkle in 3 Tbls of flour and stir it- cooking the flour and making a roux- for another two minutes
Add one can of chicken broth/ stock and it will thicken (if it needs more thickening, add some cornstarch mixed with milk later on)
Add a hand full of frozen peas to the pot and a good handful of sliced and blanched carrots.
Add the cubed meat of two baked chicken breasts (bake 30 min at 375 degrees in advance)
Adda quarte cup of half and half for toward the end.

Add salt, pepper and a couple pinches of red pepper flakes.

Ladle over mashed potatoes, toast, biscuits, or waffles.

Viola!
Life is a comedy for those who think, and a tragedy for those who feel.- Horace Walpole
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